David Doty, Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science, has received a $500K NSF CAREER Award titled “CAREER: Error-Free, Uniform and Composable Chemical Computation”. This project advances the theoretical foundation for programming chemical algorithms-that is, algorithms executed by artificially synthesized chemical reactions-ensuring they have three crucial properties that are lacking, or at best poorly understood, in existing systems: (1) error-free: implementable by real chemicals that faithfully execute the intended algorithm, (2) uniform: correct for any “population size”, i.e., the total number of molecules, unlike many current algorithms where reactions must be tailored specifically to the population size, and (3) composable: can be packaged into functional modules that are easily combined. Click here for more information about the award.

About the NSF CAREER Award: The NSF CAREER awards are the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.