Sean Peisert

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Photograph of me lecturing at the blackboard (credit: R. Benjamin Shapiro, 2002).


Activities and upcoming events that I'm involved with:

IEEE Security & Privacy (ongoing)

NSA SoS Best Paper Competition (annually)

IEEE Cybersecurity Award for Practice (annually)

NSPW 2021 (October 25–28, 2021)

IEEE S&P (Oakland) 2022 (May 22–26, 2022)

CSET 2022 (August 2022)

NSF Cybersecurity Summit (Oct. 2022)

 
 

Professional Bio

Short Bio

Dr. Sean Peisert leads computer security research and development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is also both a full adjunct professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Davis and of Health Informatics at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine.

His current research and development interests cover a broad cross section of usable and useful computer security and privacy solutions, particularly in enabling secure and privacy-preserving scientific data analysis, improving security in high-performance computing systems, and power grid control systems. He is also chief cybersecurity strategist for CENIC and co-lead of Trusted CI, the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence.

At CENIC, he is responsible for cybersecurity strategy and implementation for CENIC's enterprise as well as for CalREN, a high-capacity network designed to meet the unique requirements of CENIC's constituent population of over 10,000 institutions and 20 million users.

Professor Peisert is editor-in-chief of IEEE Security & Privacy; a member of the Distinguished Expert Review Panel for the NSA Annual Best Scientific Cybersecurity Paper Competition; a member of the DARPA Information Science and Technology (ISAT) Study Group; an ACSA Fellow; a steering committee member and past general chair of the New Security Paradigms Workshop (NSPW); steering committee member and past program co-chair of the USENIX Workshop on Cyber Security Experimentation and Test (CSET); past chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Security & Privacy; and a steering committee member and past general chair for the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, the flagship conference for security research.

He has led numerous cybersecurity-related working groups, including co-leading the 2012 Dagstuhl Seminar on Organizational Processes for Supporting Sustainable Security; leading two workshops in 2015 for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research examining research needs in high-performance computing cybersecurity; and leading formation of the DOE Integrated Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (iJC3) Cyber R&D Enterprise Cybersecurity Capability (ECC) — an R&D effort composed of 10 DOE National Labs.

In 2007, he was honored as a Research Fellow by the Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and in 2014, his work received an award from the Director of Science and Technology for the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI).

Previously, Dr. Peisert was a computer security researcher at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), and was a Senior Fellow in the Berkeley Institute for Data Science at UC Berkeley. He received his Ph.D., Masters, and Bachelors degrees in Computer Science from UC San Diego.

Long Bio

Dr. Sean Peisert leads computer security research and development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is both a full adjunct professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Davis and of Health Informatics at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine.

His current research and development interests cover a broad cross section of usable and useful computer security and privacy solutions, particularly in enabling secure and privacy-preserving scientific data analysis, improving security in high-performance computing systems, and power grid control systems. He is also chief cybersecurity strategist for CENIC and a co-lead of Trusted CI, the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. In the past, he has worked in areas including intrusion detection, computer forensics, insider threats, fault tolerance, vulnerability analysis and elections and electronic voting.

Highlights of the R&D that he has led include inventing a means to identify misuse of high-performance and cloud computing systems, by identifying computation based on their communication patterns and power usage (now patented); inventing the idea of integrating network intrusion detection and safety engineering principles, leading to a system to detect cyber attacks against power distribution grid equipment by leveraging knowledge of the electrical physics of the system; and codification of the “Medical Science DMZ” notion — a network design pattern for extremely data-intensive, high-throughput data transfers, while remaining in compliance with security regulations such as HIPAA.

At CENIC, he is responsible for cybersecurity strategy and implementation for CENIC's enterprise as well as for CalREN, a high-capacity network designed to meet the unique requirements of CENIC's constituent population of over 10,000 institutions and 20 million users.

At Trusted CI, he has led key studies into scientific data integrity, scientific data confidentiality, and software assurance in science.

In 2007, he was honored as a Research Fellow by the Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and in 2014, his work received an award from the Director of Science and Technology for the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) for scientific and technical merit.

He has taught university courses in security for health informatics, computer forensics, “insider” threats, and critical systems; advised numerous graduate students; has published more than 90 peer-reviewed papers, invited articles, book chapters, and technical reports; and has given over 90 invited talks and tutorials in a variety of venues.

He is actively involved with the computer security community, as well as communities to which he studies, develops, and applies computer security techniques, including medical and public policy organizations, and other organizations operating critical infrastructure. He works closely with industry, and is a member of the Cybersecurity Research and Development Advisory Committee for the California Joint Utility Program, “California Energy Systems for the 21st Century (CES-21),” a $35M, ratepayer-funded effort.

He has led numerous cybersecurity-related working groups, including two workshops in 2015 for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research to establish key needs and directions for a high-performance computing cybersecurity research and development program, culminating in the development of recommendations for hardware/software co-design of future high-performance computing systems to build cybersecurity for data-intensive, scientific computing in from the outset. He also led formation of the DOE Integrated Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (iJC3) Cyber R&D Enterprise Cybersecurity Capability (ECC) — an R&D effort composed of 10 DOE National Labs.

He also co-led the 2012 Dagstuhl Seminar on Organizational Processes for Supporting Sustainable Security examining issues surrounding insider threats; chaired the 2016 Workshop on Learning from Authoritative Security Experiment Results (LASER); and co-led the Open Science Cyber Risk Profile (OSCRP) working group — a cross-disciplinary group of computer security professionals and scientific researchers that worked to develop a document designed to help researchers understand the cyber risks to their work.

In addition to his work in computer security, he spent several years as a Senior Fellow at the San Diego Supercomputer Center working in areas of high-performance computing, compilers, and code optimization.

Professor Peisert is editor-in-chief of IEEE Security & Privacy; a member of the Distinguished Expert Review Panel for the NSA Annual Best Scientific Cybersecurity Paper Competition; a member of the DARPA Information Science and Technology (ISAT) Study Group; an ACSA Fellow; a steering committee member and past general chair of the New Security Paradigms Workshop (NSPW); steering committee member and past program co-chair of the USENIX Workshop on Cyber Security Experimentation and Test (CSET); past chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Security & Privacy; and a steering committee member and past general chair for the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, the flagship conference for security research.

Previously, Dr. Peisert was an I3P Research Fellow, was a computer security researcher at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), and was a Senior Fellow in the Berkeley Institute for Data Science at UC Berkeley. He received his Ph.D., Masters, and Bachelors degrees in Computer Science from UC San Diego.


Last modified: Monday, 21-Jun-2021 14:00:11 PDT